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Inbox anxiety

There are a lot of things about myself that I expected to change once I started college — more friends, better classes, less junk food (a delusion and a failure, I assure you) — but one thing I didn’t expect was my newfound addiction to checking my email. Walking to class? Let me refresh my…

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Credentials over color

This year has been a big one for women’s tennis. Serena Williams, arguably the greatest living tennis player, won a Grand Slam while pregnant and delivered a beautiful baby girl. Meanwhile, her rival Maria Sharapova not only returned to the circuit after fulfilling the conditions of her suspension for using banned substances but also authored a book. That book immediately…

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Short Circuit

Teachers can learn something from electricians.  For example, taking the path of least resistance isn’t always the best way to go.  If we want the lights to go on, the current needs to flow through the full circuit, and a short cut, like a nail lying across the wire, usually results in darkness. English teachers,…

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How Does Technology Affect Teen Health and Well-Being?

When I was teenager, my parents worried about how much and what I watched on television. They could monitor that pretty effectively, as there were only three network channels and limited options. For parents today, not only are there hundreds of channels to monitor, but teens have access to the internet, video games, social media,…

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For God, for country and for friends

If you left Yale at this exact moment, how many people would you honestly still keep in touch with in a meaningful way? When I asked this question of myself, I recoiled at how few people would have made the list. I have many people in my life who are friendly. There are the smiles…

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At Winsor School, the Student-Teacher Relationship Drives Academic Support

Laura Vantine Academic support is a significant concern for independent schools — more so today than in the past. On the surface, the trends seem worrisome: A number of schools say more students are struggling, while others report that more parents are pushing for individual support and accommodations, specifically so their children can gain extended time…

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A message from “dumb” athletes

While some seem to believe that nothing athletes have to say is worthy of their time, we want to discuss why recent statements about student-athletes have underestimated just about every Yale student, in addition to shaming and devaluing a specific group within this community. The central message of these negative stereotypes is that student-athletes do…

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Growing up (wanting to be) white

On Hollywood whitewashing and why representation matters When I was younger, I wanted to be an author. I wanted to write short stories and plays and novels. I thought something was keeping me back, though — my name. I didn’t think the name “Jessica Li” would look good on a byline, underneath the glossy title…

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Dismantling Consistency

Our lives are fuller if we accept that our personalities are malleable. Stanford University researcher Walter Mischel’s “Marshmallow Experiment” has become a classic child psychology test. A group of 3- to 5-year-old children were given a choice between eating a marshmallow immediately upon receiving it or waiting 15 minutes and being rewarded with a second…

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Middle school suicide

USA Today Network has published an important, troubling article, “America sees alarming spike in middle school suicide rate.” “The suicide rate among 10- to 14-year-olds doubled between 2007 and 2014, for the first time surpassing the death rate in that age group from car crashes, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. In 2014…

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